Technology: Elements of Worship Series (Part 11)

Given the focus in modern culture that technology is a solution to all problems (can anyone say, “Enlightenment”?), it is important for the church of today to think more clearly about the use of technology in the church.

We certainly do not want to abandon technology, since the use of technology has a long history of significance in the church.  The use of the printing press during the Reformation era is one such positive example.  However, we must think about it deeply and critically so that technology does not overtake or subvert the purposes of the church.

It has been noted by many observers that modern worship methods in the Western Church are pregnant with entertainment models and practices, and technology is the driving force behind this move.  One example of this trend is ear-bud monitor systems.

We gather a group of musicians and charge them with the responsibility of leading a congregation in worship.  Then take these people, place them on a stage, turn up the lights on stage (and down in the house), and ask them to use in-ear monitors because “we can control the sound better that way.”

You have just completely isolated the worship leaders from the people they are to be leading.

Not only is it difficult for the leader to see those in front of them because of the lights, but possibly more startlingly is that they cannot HEAR the interaction of the congregation (or more properly, the audience!).  How do they know if the people are being led?  How are they interacting with people from whom they are isolated in their own little world of what is being piped through their monitor system?

Ear-buds may solve some problems with mixing and sound reproduction, but the loss of true corporate worship and the erosion of community are unfortunate by-products.  This might be alright for entertainment, but what is it doing to the Church and its worship?

These are the kinds of questions we must consider as leaders.

 

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Posted on April 27, 2015, in Christian Worldview, Content of Worship, Corporate Worship, Leadership, theology, Worship Leader and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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